Altered brain tissue viscoelasticity in pediatric cerebral palsy measured by magnetic resonance elastography

TitleAltered brain tissue viscoelasticity in pediatric cerebral palsy measured by magnetic resonance elastography
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsChaze, C. A., McIlvain G., Smith D. R., Villermaux G. M., Delgorio P. L., Wright H. G., Rogers K. J., Miller F., Crenshaw J. R., & Johnson C. L.
JournalNeuroImage. Clinical
Volume22
Pagination101750
Date Published2019 Mar 07
ISSN2213-1582
KeywordsBrain; Cerebral Palsy; Magnetic resonance elastography; pediatric; stiffness; Viscoelasticity
Abstract

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results in functional motor impairment and disability in children. CP is characterized by neural injury though many children do not exhibit brain lesions or damage. Advanced structural MRI measures may be more sensitively related to clinical outcomes in this population. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) measures the viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissue, which vary extensively between normal and disease states, and we hypothesized that the viscoelasticity of brain tissue is reduced in children with CP. Using a global region-of-interest-based analysis, we found that the stiffness of the cerebral gray matter in children with CP is significantly lower than in typically developing (TD) children, while the damping ratio of gray matter is significantly higher in CP. A voxel-wise analysis confirmed this finding, and additionally found stiffness and damping ratio differences between groups in regions of white matter. These results indicate that there is a difference in brain tissue health in children with CP that is quantifiable through stiffness and damping ratio measured with MRE. Understanding brain tissue mechanics in the pediatric CP population may aid in the diagnosis and evaluation of CP.

DOI10.1016/j.nicl.2019.101750
Alternate JournalNeuroimage Clin
Refereed DesignationRefereed