Hip Reconstruction in Children With Unilateral Cerebral Palsy and Hip Dysplasia

TitleHip Reconstruction in Children With Unilateral Cerebral Palsy and Hip Dysplasia
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsAbousamra, O., Er M. S., Rogers K. J., Nishnianidze T., Dabney K. W., & Miller F.
JournalJournal of pediatric orthopedics
Volume36
Issue8
Pagination834-840
Date Published2016 Dec
ISSN1539-2570
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Highly functioning children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) who have hip involvement (type IV hemiplegia) may present with hip dysplasia during their adolescence. The aim of this report is to assess the outcomes of combined femoral and acetabular reconstruction in this population.
METHODS: This study is a retrospective review of all patients with unilateral CP, Gross Motor Function Classification System types I and II, who had hip reconstruction for unilateral dysplasia between 1989 and 2013. Clinical variables (pain and hip passive range of motion) were reviewed. Hip morphology was assessed radiographically according to Melbourne Cerebral Palsy Hip Classification System. Three-dimensional gait analyses were also reviewed to evaluate the effect of surgery on these patients' gaits.
RESULTS: Twelve patients were included with a mean age at surgery of 14 years (range, 7 to 19 y) and follow-up mean of 4 years (range, 1 to 8 y). Nine hips were improved according to Melbourne Cerebral Palsy Hip Classification System. Migration percentage decreased significantly (P<0.001) from 45% (30% to 86%) to 15% (0% to 28%). Neck shaft angle decreased (P<0.001) from 144 degrees (range, 129 to 156 degrees) to 125 degrees (range, 114 to 139 degrees). Tonnis angle and Sharp angle also decreased significantly. All patients were pain free at the last visit. Overall level of gait function as measured by Gait Deviation Index and Gait Profile Score [78 (61 to 89) and 12 (8 to 16), respectively] for all patients was maintained without significant changes.
CONCLUSIONS: In hemiplegic type IV CP, with high functional level (Gross Motor Function Classification System I and II), hip dysplasia is a rare occurrence during adolescent years. Combined hip reconstruction improves hip morphology, relieves pain, and maintains a high level of function.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV-therapeutic study.





Alternate JournalJ Pediatr Orthop
Refereed DesignationRefereed